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STRUGGLES
September 14th, 6-11 pm
 

The neurosis of Struggles the Clown and the attempt at self care through a lunar and Saturn return. A retrospect of work by Alyssa Putnam featuring new and old paintings, sculptures, & other treasures.

 
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GLORY HOLES; CIRCLE JERKS AND HAPPY ENDINGS
August 10th, 6-11 pm
 

Queer Seattle artist Clyde Petersen presents a new series of work at the Factory for August 2017.

Protest posters, manifestos, Seeking ads, still life drawings, large scale comics and the occasional Glory Hole.

 
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BLOW UP
July 13th, 6-11 pm
 

Mount Analogue and The Factory are excited to present BLOW UP, a show about coming apart / coming together / the joy of inflatables / the playfulness of reality / and all of our eventual ends ~

FEATURING the work of these beautiful souls :
Amanda James Parker
Peter Dodds
Trevor Dykstra & the Seattle Design Nerds
Guy Merrill

Y'all really don't want to miss the chance to run through a custom-made large-scale inflatable tunnel to greet some handmade balloons while a million colors get projected around you and a soundscape explodes in your ear -- then you can grab a blow pop and chill in one of our blow-up chairs ~

 

 

IN OUR SPACE
June 8th, 6-11 pm
 

Within the queer community it is necessary to work with one another, to strengthen and support each other, so that all can succeed. The connections we make are integral to who we are and how we see the world. This has shaped how Jessica Marie Mercy creates. It has pushed her to produce art that serves the queer community, and has drawn her to the spaces we inhabit.

By immortalizing the spaces where we gather safely, Jessica Marie Mercy invite’s others to treat them with the reverence they deserve, and so rarely receive. “In Our Space” brings visibility to queer spaces and allows for detailed examinations of the physical, emotional, and spiritual spaces we thrive in.

Within her prints, she attempts to bridge the gap between her printmaking and queer communities, to create accessible fine art, and begin a dialogue around identifying safe spaces.

 

BOROUGH BODY
May 11th, 6-11 pm
 

A collaboration between painter Douglas Degges and writer Chelsea Werner-Jatzke inspired by their separate lives in New York City. This is a collection of two maps of the New York City Subway system—one visual, one textual, both inspired by specific abstraction. Degges' collection of low relief carvings investigate how abstraction can render specific and autobiographical content anonymous, including five paintings created from Werner-Jatzke's photos and in conjunction with her writing which shifts between the personal and general, bringing details into view to challenge the memory, and the identity constructed, of them.

Degges' work calls attention to the tension between the image—the thing that we can hold in our mind—and the object that holds or supports it. Werner-Jatzke's writing churns through a physical space that is both a subterranean city and a human body.

This exhibition gives Degges and Werner-Jatzke's "Borough Body" physical form for the first time. Their collaborative project was previously published online, as part of Territory's Issue II: Underworlds. You can find the project here: http://themapisnot.com/issue-ii-douglas-degges-chelsea-wernerjatzke. This exhibition includes wall texts by Werner-Jatzke and paintings by Degges.

Douglas Degges is a visual artist and educator living in Chattanooga, TN where he teaches at the University of Tennessee. His work has recently been exhibited at The Shed Space in Brooklyn, NY, mild climate and Zeitgeist Gallery in Nashville, TN, and the Athens Institute for Contemporary Art in Athens, GA.

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke is the author of Adventures in Property Management (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017) and Thunder Lizard(H_NGM_N, 2016). She is outreach coordinator at Conium Review and co-founder of Till, a literary organization offering an annual residency. Read her in Bodega, Hobart, H_NGM_N, Sonora Review, Monkeybicycle, Everyday Genius, and Tupelo Quarterly, among others.

 

PAINTINGS, OR IT DIDN'T HAPPEN!
April 13th, 7-11 pm
 

The Factory presents new work by Mike Force, Kelly Bjork, and Aidan Fitzgerald.

This show has it all: intimate paintings of humans in interiors, paintings of internet memes, even paintings of paintings. You’ll just have to see it to believe it!

 
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DON'T WASH THIS OFF
March 9th, 7-11 pm
 

"I am a young black man dealing with new emotional and moral challenges daily, constantly ready to engage or evade problematic situations. Because this is how I exist it is also how I create, when painting there is no planning, sketching, or second tries. When I start working on a piece it all comes together in that moment.” - Roache the muralist

Join Roache the muralist on Thursday, March 9th as he creates a live mural in and around The Factory. This unpredictable painting performance will cover the walls, as well as objects placed inside the gallery including canvas, chairs, and even nude bodies.

Roache's artistic practice is one based of symbolism and icons. He uses playful characters and objects to convey much bigger and controversial concepts including race, sex, and politics.

 

HOUSE PARTY
February 9th, 6-11 pm
 

Napoleon Do and Landon Gauthier exhibit 35mm film photography in their collective show, House Party. 

Landon takes pictures of houses, capturing them in the soft light of the setting sun, shrouded in shadows of trees cast onto their pastel painted panels. Pictures of the porches where cigarettes are shared on warm summer nights, and of roofs where late night stragglers climb to watch the sun rise.

Napoleon takes pictures of parties, shooting the nights filled with 24-packs, red solo cups, and the smiling faces of the blissfully drunk. He perfectly captures the exuberant round of shots taken at last call to the indulgent moments of after-hours that are otherwise only remembered as a blur.

Join us on Thursday, February 9th to peer into the windows of House Party.

 

SLIDE SHOW
January 12th, 6-11 pm
 

In this new series of paintings, Marie Hausauer uses a discarded stockpile of 35mm family portraits as her muse. Recovered from antique stores, these photos from the sixties serve as a reflection of her own dread about family, routine, and the conventional.

Marie Hausauer is a cartoonist living in Seattle. She self publishes comics as well as contributing to Thick as Thieves, Intruder and Seattle Weekly.

 

ABOUT ONE THIRD OF ORGASMS
December 8th, 6-11 pm
 

Ethan Folk and Ty Wardwell
Present the second installment of their "cute & nonthreatening" trilogy.

Part 2:
"about one third of orgasms"
Capitol Hill art walk
december 8
the factory
1216 10th ave
6-10pm (*free*)

With:
Ink and butter washes.
Live no-hands painting with a paintbrush from the butcher shop.
POV “action” films.
Never-before-seen 25 minute single take of the performance that became “breakfast in bed,” a prize-winning film at HUMP! 2016.
 

 

OUT OF LINE: EXPLORATIONS IN MATERIAL, TEXTURE, FORM
November 10th, 6-11 pm
 

Born out of thread, wire, brass and stone, the work of Shaana Hatamian, Hannah Eberts and Shirley Hendrickson is driven by the possibilities of line and shape that emerge instinctually from their chosen mediums. 

Their highly tactile pieces grab the eye with graphic compositions and rich, layered detail, united by a common, improvisational approach. 

Shaana Hatamian – textiles
http://shaanahatamian.com/

Hannah Eberts – textiles
http://hannaheberts.tumblr.com/

Shirley Hendrickson – wall hangings
http://shirleykhendrickson.com/

 
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ART IS MAGIC. MAGIC IS ART. ZAP!
October 13th, 6-11 pm
 

Magic is not a dysphemism for the unbelievable; it is a sacred title for the otherwise inexpressible. 

Jamie Christene Petersen's paintings transform the mystical realm into a tangible visual artifact that is both active and decorative, filled with traditional and folk symbols of nature, grace, beauty and mortality. It is inspired by alchemy and the mystical forces that engage and entwine our visual world to our inner landscape. 

In this show Peterson creates imagery that evokes the earth as they would like to experience it: another, warmer & more inviting world.

 

UNDEVELOPED
September 8, 6-11 pm
 

Have you ever reached under your bed and found a roll of film languishing in obscurity amid your watermelon Bubblicious wrappers? What tragedy is this? How many of these are there and what untold secrets might they bestow on us if only given the chance? If a letter is never mailed is it still a letter? What if it’s only an envelope of sand? 

UNDEVELOPED is a show in which we unearth these expired, warped, and corroded moments of life and bring them into the light of day to be seen and heard before they are once again lost to the sands of time. Join us in this empty pool, on the edge of a secret beach, inside the intimate cabana of The Factory, as we shall all bathe for one evening in the same bizarre collective, wonderful, beautiful, trash strewn seaside memory of a childhood that never was.

ARTISTS:
Efraín
Sandy Wittenhagen
Tommy Nease
Lauren Segarra
Lauren Max
Timothy Rysdyke

 

BE THE YOU YOU WANT TO SEE IN YOURSELF
August 11, 6-11 pm
 

Have you ever reached deep into a bag of Flaming Hot Cheetos and come up with nothing but a handful of glitter and glass? Welcome to Brittany Kusa’s world; a Hidden Valley™ filled with grotesque, gluttonous beauty. Hop on your bike and explore her land of vaginal mountains, butts, and naked women seductively coddling oversized bottles of ranch, all set amongst a Lisa Frank colored sunset. 

In Kusa's work, nature gives birth to things typically considered beautiful. However, upon closer inspection, we discover a world of oozing chaotic majesty, where she presents the uncomfortable truths of daily existence in a humorous way.

Brittany Kusa has previously shown at various galleries throughout Seattle, such as Vermillion, Derek Erdman’s International House of Paintings and Fantagraphics Bookstore. She was most recently a regular contributor to Intruder, and has published illustrations with the Stranger and Seattle Weekly.

——

"Brittany Kusa makes work that gushes, glitters and vomits an inimitable humor that’s as gross as it is sexy. It also harbors a distinctively scathing and unapologetic feminist bent. Or just a Brittany-gives-zero-fucks bent.” --Amanda Manitach for City Arts

FOOLS OUT FOR SUMMER
July 14, 6-11 pm
 

Los Angeles based visual artist David Kaul combines a world of repetitive monikers, colorful pop art, and summertime randomness in this one night solo show opening at The Factory, Thursday, July 14th.

David's paintings are bright, hand painted patterns with subtle imperfections making each shape unique in itself. 

Fools Out for Summer is a dedicated collection of work paying homage to how perfect Northwest summers can be.

www.adsstudio.co | www.instagram.com/artdesignsurface/

 

QUEER FEELINGS
June 9, 6-11 pm
 

Adrien Leavitt’s “Queer Feelings” is a photographic exploration of queerness and our intimate, complex relationship with our bodies, both physically and emotionally. It is an exploration of vulnerability, blurring the space between private and public, possessing a new reality where our desire, mutability, and openness are able to gaze back at us.

This exhibition is the first showing of the project and includes unreleased work. Join us during the second annual Queer Art Walk for a photographic exploration of Queer Feelings.

www.queerfeelings.com | www.instagram.com/queerfeelings

 

ANDREW LAMB SCHULTZ
May 11, 6-11 pm
 

In a series of new drawings and paintings, Andrew Schultz uses flat, graphic forms and bubblegum colored explorations of pop, kitsch, and geometric line drawings. Aiming to convey scenes of willful isolation, ritual, and an inescapable queerness, Andrew works within a kaleidoscope of influences and references aiming to create an aesthetic world of absurd humor, poignant beauty and probably a dash of perversion.

 

HAIRSTORY
April 14, 6-10 pm
 

Hairstory is an art show, reading, and interactive performance featuring over 40 individuals' experiences about hair, opening on April 14th at The Factory. Hairstory tells how hair highlights or contributes to our culture, sexuality, color, religion, and gender. Featuring artwork and personal stories about bad haircuts, body hair, pubic hair, the lack of hair, shaving habits, and more.

Featuring artwork by Bryn Mooney, Demi Shaft Raven, Devin Ball, Ellen Forney, Jake Fennell, Janell Langford, Justice Latreice, Larissa Barth, Lethe Smith, and Mary Anne Carter.

Audio and video by Anna Lenau, Kyle Bain & Timothy Rysdyke, Rana San & Will Myers, and Stephen Anunson & Ariel Burke.

Poetry readings by Anis Gisele, Anna Lenau, Erin MacDonald, Isis Zystrid, and Imani Sims.

Haircuts by Marcia Galan.

 

PLASTIC
March 10, 6-10 pm
 

The Factory presents Katlyn Hubner with her first solo show in Seattle featuring her series "Plastic."

People of all ages and backgrounds are drawn to the Plastic paintings. Couples, singles, adolescents, children – you name it; they welcome the idea of this series and enjoy them in different ways and see past the nudity. The similarities the dolls and humans share, as far as the “female” dolls go, is that both have breasts, hips, buttocks, an hourglass shape. The differences between flesh and plastic, is that they are missing nipples, and some models of the dolls have built-in panties or leotards. The dolls in my compositions are in far more intimate situations than I would ever dare place live models, and they are embraced by the viewers with no judgement. 

We usually would interact with these dolls as innocent children. During this young chapter of our lives we have not been tainted by the world with what is right or wrong, and what should or should not be seen. In today’s life, violence is far more prevalent in homes than sensuality. The dolls have made it possible for us to dive into the compositions and forget our pretenses. Life size, large paintings, these plastic figures enter a timeless contemporary dimension since we all have known them since our childhood and in the right hands can transcend our personal confinements.

A NEED OF SPACE
February 11, 6-10 pm
 

In their inaugural solo exhibition, “A Need of Space,” Juan Franco creates visual analogies of theoretical spaces and scenes. These spaces may never exist, or have already existed. The history of the spaces is uncertain, yet their traces become apparent. Their [re]appearance, their [re]emergence is beautiful. Like skin, architectural blueprints become landscapes when rearranged abstractly. They also become impossible diagrams of what they truly represent. They are long overdue, they are justified, and they are as close to real as they can be presently.

A mother and a child.
A blueprint and a building.
A negative and a photograph.

Juan Franco uses architecture, text, and photography to present work that holds authorial multiplicity constricting time from each work’s genesis to their current existence in this exhibition. This action serves as a constant rebirth, a continuous cycle in (re)claiming a sense of cultural and historical purpose.

About the Artist
Juan Franco was born in Bogotá and they were transported to Seattle in 2000 by an architect.


POWER, LOVE, SEX, MONEY, FAME
January 14, 6-11 pm

From the steamy discos of swinging London to the glittering casinos of the Las Vegas strip. From the chic runways of Milan to the mean streets of Hollywood California. And now at the Factory in Seatte, it's...

POWER LOVE SEX MONEY FAME: An artistic evening celebrating the life and works of best-selling author JACKIE COLLINS, whose epic sagas of love and lust, power and privilege, cocaine and champagne, blackmail and murder, introduced us to the cutthroat world of a dazzling array of characters.

Featuring paintings and photos by TARA THOMAS, audio installation by DAN PAULUS, and dishes prepared from Jackie's cookbook by JOE RANDAZZO.

 

A REALLY BIG AND VERY EXPENSIVE PAINTING
December 10, 6-10 pm
 

Graham Downing explores the correlation between a paintings' size and price. Featuring one very big, expensive painting, and the opportunity for attendees to buy a piece of it for as low as one dollar. 

Top ten most expensive paintings of all time broken down by cost per square inch:

1. When Will You Marry Me? (40 in × 30 in) $250,000 per square inch
2. The Card Players (51 in x 38 in) $141,898 per square inch
3. Pendant portraits of Oopjen Coppit (82 in by 52 in) $38,927 per square inch
4. Women of Algiers (45 in × 57.6 in) $62,478 per square inch
5. Reclining Nude (23 in × 36 in) $199,063 per square inch
6. No. 5, 1984 (8ft x 4ft) $35,590 per square inch
7. Woman III (68 in × 48 in) $42,126 per square inch
8. Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (54 in × 54 in) $48,560 per square inch
9. The Dream (51 in × 38 in) $81,011 per square inch
10. Portrait of Dr. Gachet (23 in × 22 in) $295,256 per square inch

 

FLUFF PIECE
November 12, 6-10 pm
 

FLUFF PIECE is a cozy conversation pit made of inflated status objects born of vapid wealth driven culture.
FLUFF PIECE is where YOU can make it rain, swim in treasure, roll in dough, queen for a day.
Make yourself comfortable, spend time with friends, cleeer your mind and relaaax in FLUFF PIECE.

 Amanda James Parker creates three-dimensional works that probe the physical and psychological relationships which exist between the living and the “inanimate”.    

 
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12 SECONDS MAX
October 8, 6-10 pm

12 Seconds Max is an immersive wash of artist-made, ultra-short form videos, animations and moving images. At a time when our attention spans compress to milliseconds, we converse in animated GIFs, and we scratch our heads in misty contemplation of what it means to own digital art, we invite you to a curated assemblage of gems from Seattle and beyond. A selection of one-of-a-kind and short-run videos will be available for purchase.

The exhibition will feature a wall of screens with looping short videos, projected video, and featured works from Kurt Geissel, Johan Liedgren, Britta Johnson, and Jesse Higman & Roxanne Nihiline.

Full list of artists included in 12 Seconds Max: Alan Fulle, Alexander Martinz, Amanda James Parker, Angel O'Leary, Brandon Vosika, Brendan Griffin, Britta Johnson, Chelsea Klukas, Chris Corner, Chris Lefebvre, Christian French, Demi Raven, Ellie Dicola, Erin frost, Fernando Orellana, Flora Goldthwaite, Gil Alkabetz, Gregory John Smith, Jacob Fennell, Jaimes Mayhew, Jesse Higman & Roxanne Nihiline, Jessie Lyle, Joe Vollan, Johan Liedgren, John Osebold, John Williamson, Joseph Gray, Juan Franco, Julia Chamberlain, Justin Colt Beckman, Katie Clark & Tyler Lucas, Kenny Montana, Kimberly Collmer, Kristoffer Larson, Kurt Geissel, Kyle Bain, Lars Bergquist, Marlow Harris, Mary Anne Carter, Maurice Caldwell, Max Cleary, Michael Tyka, Michael Shannon, Michelle Hiphoppe, Mick Bello, Mimi Allin, Nichole Hart, Nikolai Lesnikov, Nola Avienne, Reilly Donovan, Rosemary Liss, Ross Laing, Salise Hughes, Sam McHaney & Rachel Houser, Sandra Whittington, Sara Van Belten, Scott Ashley, Shaun Kardinal, Stefan Gruber, Steve Lombardi, Tim Marsden, Ulises Mariscal, Wax Diamond, Yancy Way, and Yonnas Getahun.

Curated by Janet Galore & The Factory

 

RODRIGO VALENZUELA
September 10, 6-11 pm

Back in March when Rodrigo Valenzuela heard we were opening the Factory, he immediately asked for a show. Why give him a show when he'd just wrapped up a solo exhibit at Frye Art Museum? "I want to show work in Seattle that no one else will want to show or buy," he said. So the Factory presents Valenzuela's Seattle debut of a body of large-scale works that we think—regardless of what he says—are fucking cool. To make the series, Valenzuela appropriated the iconography of labor unions from around the world, creating fantastical, larger-than-life, screen-printed flags made with raw canvas and house paint from Home Depot. 

Valenzuela's statement: 

"We all feel this way (I do too): What is the point of doing anything if we cannot be unique? We actively try to escape our duties to make society better, but the less we organize, the more we yield power to the wealthy and to corporations, losing not only things like social security but our everyday identity too. I worry about my future as an artist. I worry that other artists don't consider themselves working class, building discipline and an economy, and working to help society understand that thinking is a labor-intensive duty."

See more at http://www.rodrigovalenzuela.com/

 

MAD WORLD
August 13, 6-10 pm

Mad World is a photo collaboration between Lauren Max, photographer, and Naomi Rincon, hair and make-up artist. Together, they've created a new portrait series that focuses on a fantasy world all their own by pairing natural settings and elements with unusual and futuristically-styled models as their subjects.

Naomi Rincon currently resides at Bang Salon as a hair stylist, and works with various designers, musicians, and photographers on editorial projects and shows in her spare time.

Lauren Max, a northwest native, is an editorial and commercial photographer that has been shooting in the greater Seattle area for years. She has worked with Nylon Magazine, Seattle Met, The Stranger, and many other local and international publications. Currently, she has a monthly fashion and lifestyle feature in City Arts Magazine. To see more of her work, visit laurenmaxphotography.com

 

THE LEAST BORING POETRY EVENT OF THE YEAR
August 11, 7-10 pm

Join us for “The Least Boring Poetry Event of the Year” featuring New York’s Ben Fama and Monica McClure with Seattle’s own Sarah Galvin. Visual art by Mary Anne Carter will accompany the reading.

Ben Fama is a writer based in New York City. He is the author of Fantasy (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2015), and the chapbooks Odalisque (Bloof, 2014), Cool Memories (Spork, 2013), New Waves (Minutes Books, 2011), and Aquarius Rising (Ugly Duckling Presse 2010). He is also the author of the artist book Mall Witch (Wonder, 2012). He is the co-founder of Wonder.

Sarah Galvin, the author of “The Three Einsteins,” which City Arts Magazine dubbed “the funniest book of poetry in the world.” Her blog, The Pedestretarian, is devoted to reviews of food found on the street. She has an MFA in poetry from University of Washington. In the Spring of 2025, Galvin cofounded Seattle’s oldest art space, lifestyle blog, and lifestyle, Fashion Hot Dog 225. She is widely known as "The Champagne of Queers." Her poems and essays can be found in io, New Ohio Review, Pleiades, Pinwheel, Vice Magazine and The Stranger.

Monica McClure: "McClure may be the poster-girl for a new generation of poets: irreverent, well-read, sexy, even dirty, snarky, but ultimately fighting an earnest battle against reductiveness and easy answers to the complex problems of the Internet age: 'Every citizen of this world is on trial / I'm learning to speak legalese / as I stroll through civil law like / a gamine through a sample sale.'"—Craig Morgan Teicher for NPR Books. TENDER DATA is Monica McClure's debut poetry collection. She is the author of the chapbooks Mood Swing and Mala.

Visual Art by Mary Anne Carter, a visual artist with professional and sexual ties to the poetry community. She will showcase a series of work that visually translates the work of contemporary poets including Fama, Galvin, and McClure to paper and apparel. In the Spring of 2025, she cofounded Seattle’s oldest art space, lifestyle blog, and lifestyle, Fashion Hot Dog 225. Although she is best known for wearing a shit ton of capes, her work has appeared on the covers of “Enough” by Chris Martin, “Sakra Boccata” by José Antonio Mazzotti’, and Ugly Duckling Presse’s “6x6.”

 

THE GIRL'S ROOM
July 9, 6-10 pm

Ashley Armitage is a 21-year-old photographer from Seattle currently majoring in photography at the University of Washington. Her work is an exploration of the representation of femininity, examining the rituals, mythology and fantasy intertwined with images of the feminine. For the last few months, she has focused on highlighting the private lives and routines of girlhood: applying makeup, getting dressed, hanging out in bedrooms, gossiping in bathrooms. Such things constitute traditional visions of girlhood and womanhood that are often reduced to cliché and condemned as superficial, vain, petty, and catty. Her work is an attempt to reclaim these activities.

 

NEW PAINTINGS BY JOHN CRISCITELLO
June 11, 6-11 pm

As apart of Seattle Pride's first ever Queer Art Walk. 

Press: John Criscitello's New NSFW Paintings Are So Dirty and Penis-Filled I Can't Show Them Above the Jump

"John Criscitello is the smart-ass street artist who's making a ton of work about the bro-ification of Capitol Hill. He's the guy who first got noticed locally for putting a penis on a Jagermeister ad. There are so many penises in his new paintings I'm not going to do that to your coworkers' eyeballs. A few NSFW shots of Criscitello's penis-filled latest paintings are after the jump. Puffy jackets galore. They were taken with my cell phone at Criscitello's opening at The Factory last night." 

 
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QUEER FEELINGS
June 6, 4-8 pm

“Queer Feelings” is the debut exhibition by Aaron Klouzal and David Strand. Presenting new paintings bound and draped on various frames, “Queer Feelings” is the culmination of Klouzal and Strand’s four years of study at Seattle University. The exhibition will be on view for one night only at The Factory before moving to the Kinsey Gallery on Seattle University’s campus.

Aaron Klouzal is a painter who is inspired by the vividity and melodramaticism in animation and video game artwork. In his paintings, Klouzal is interested in investigating the authenticity of emotional presentation and performance. 

David Strand is an artist and writer born and raised in West Seattle. With a sense of spontaneity and variability, Strand makes paintings and collages that seek to evoke the idiosyncrasies of desire through the language of color. Saturated, soaked, and stained these works carry traces from the fundamental gap within the self that cannot be seen but only felt.

 

THE JOKE'S ON US
MAY 14, 6-10 pm

The Joke's On Us: an exhibition by tnglr (www.tnglrart.com), Peter Benjamin Bigelow and Donald Walingford. Based upon their street art installation of faux Proposed Land Use Signs in front of Seattle Landmarks on April Fool's Day 2015.

The installation is intended to fuel and raise the profile of the debate over the rapid growth of the City of Seattle, building development, gentrification and their effects upon the infrastructure, power structure, artists, lifetime natives, poor and disenfranchised, personality, appearance and soul of the City of Seattle. Who is benefiting and who is being squeezed...The Joke's On Us.

News links:
kiro7
Komo 4
Seattle Times

 
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Due Process
April 9,  6 - 11 pm
PDL takes on gentrification, the Pike/Pine nightlife and Capitol Hill bro culture.

Initial Reflections on PDL Artist Tryouts // Friday, 3 April 2015

Location: Pike St., South side, loading bay between Bimbo’s & Big Mario’s

Weather: clear and upper 40s, windy, full moon

Dual Hypotheses:
Pessimistic- Friday nights on Capitol Hill have evolved into something intractably hideous.  There is now a critical mass of 20-something-year-old cool-seekers who strut around in peacock feathers, being variously entitled, violent, abusive, disrespectful to any constructive form of civilized society, and oblivious to the higher functions of the human brain.  They are completely unaware of Capitol Hill’s history as a “gay neighborhood” and its designation as an “Arts District.”  They are there to tie one on, find sex partners, or alternately beat the shit out of someone to prove their rightful place in the social order of human animals.  Any attempts to interact with them on an artistic or intellectual level will be met with deep stares of ignorance, vulgar or vapid dismissals ending in the words “Bro!” or “Woooo!,” or aggressive physical behavior.  We will constantly be warding off bodily harm, theft, and untoward psychological abuse, involving the derogatory use of the word “faggot.”

Optimistic- Friday nights on Capitol Hill have changed hands to a younger crowd, but the spirit of creativity lies latent in the ambitions of these energetic social folk.  With proper outlets and a hands-on presence, the Friday night crowd can become educated and, if prompted, contribute to the artistic life of the neighborhood.  We will spend our night delightfully navigating a horde of curious, talented, potential artists, with whom we will have intelligent conversations and cathartic interactions, helping to unleash a desire to make more, do more, and be more than just someone who wants to wait in line for shots of Fireball, have sex with ill-chosen partners, or cling to the slick tenets of mass-produced pop culture.

Conclusion:    
So, based on 5-plus hours of observation, we conclude that our second, more positive hypothesis was more accurate.  As for the general nature of the Friday night scene, the crowd was decidedly more diverse, less averse, and more inclined to art-making and intelligent interaction that our fears and the harshly-flung public opinions of late.  There was still tell of deviance- a critical mass of blinking police lights just west of Broadway on Pike St. around 1 am.  A friend reported that she had read of several violent acts perpetrated in that block of Pike between Harvard and Boylston recently. Another friend expressed that a different scene took place up on 11th, at the confluence of the lines to get in Barça, Grimm’s, and the Rhino Room.  That’s only a few hundred feet away, mind you.   

As for the art, there was a feeling that the vast majority of people who participated were interested in a quick fix, and they primarily employed tried-and-true styles and methods for mark-making which conveyed simple identity-based or glib messages.  Roughly 10 percent of all who made art, though, seemed to experience a raw creative moment- using drawing to express something that they grappled with while making it- whether writing a testimony, crafting a spontaneous image, or exploring the limits of the media provided.  How that stacks up against the larger numbers of people who make art involves statistics I can’t even fathom how to compile, but I imagine that it’s not too far from the norm.   -PDL

 
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WELCOME TO THE FACTORY FT. BRITTANY KUSA & JOE GARBER
March 12, 6-11 pm

The Factory, a new Capitol Hill art gallery and event space, is excited to open its doors on March 12th. Please join us to celebrate our debut with drinks and an opening exhibit featuring new paintings, mirror pieces, and video installations by Brittany Kusa & Joe Garber.

MARCH 12TH, 6-11PM
THE FACTORY
1216 10TH AVE

“I believe in low lights and trick mirrors.” - Andy Warhol